Speed Force
You Can Now Subscribe or Pre-Order Flash: Season Zero

Flash Season Zero VariantComiXology now has the digital-first comic Flash: Season Zero in its catalog. The first issue, scheduled for September 8, is available for pre-order, and the series is available for subscription.

And hey…that art style looks familiar, doesn’t it? We know previous Flash artist/writer Francis Manapul is doing a variant cover for #1, so chances are this is part of that cover.

(Hat tip to FlashFans.org)

Kelson.

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ComiXology’s Multiversity Sale Includes Digital Flash of Two Worlds

ComiXology is running a Multiversity Sale, putting backissues from DC Comics dealing with multiple (or just alternate) realities on discount for 99c each. In addition to the entire run of 52, Crisis on Infinite Earths, Zero Hour, Infinite Crisis and Final Crisis, there’s a selection of alternate reality comics — Batman: Gotham by Gaslight, which inspired DC to launch the Elseworlds label, Superman: Red Son, Kingdom Come — and a smattering of one-off stories like the first meeting between the Justice League and Justice Society, and two classic Silver Age Flash issues: Flash #123, featuring the first meeting of Barry Allen and Jay Garrick, and Flash #125, “Conquerors of Time,” in which Barry Allen and Wally West battle a threat to Earth’s past, present and future. It’s notable as the first appearance of the Cosmic Treadmill.

“Conquerors of Time” has been available digitally for several years, but “Flash of Two Worlds” has just been added to the catalog today.

Flash #123: Flash of Two Worlds

Kelson.

The post ComiXology’s Multiversity Sale Includes Digital Flash of Two Worlds appeared first on Speed Force.

TV Guide broke the news that, as we predicted, DC is launching new digital-first Flash and Arrow tie-in comics this fall. Flash: Season Zero will take place between the pilot and second episode, and will “embrace the franchise’s colorful roots” a bit more than the more “grounded” TV show with its own set of comic-specific villains.

Season Zero, which is being co-written by Brooke Eikmeier and Katherine Walczak and features art by Phil Hester and Eric Gapstur, will showcase the entire TV cast, plus these new rogues, a group of circus performers who gained super powers as a result of the S.T.A.R. Labs particle accelerator explosion that also transformed Barry (as seen in the Arrow episode “Three Ghosts,” as well as The Flash’s pilot). This “freakshow gallery,” as Kreisberg calls them, are lead by Mr. Bliss, a character who first appeared in DC’s Starman comic series: “He has the ability to manipulate peoples’ emotions. He and his cadre of circus folk have decided that they’ve been pushed around long enough and are going to take it to society.”

Digital chapters will be released on Mondays, with Flash and Arrow alternating each week. The first digital chapter of Flash: Season Zero will be available on September 8, with the first print edition hitting the shelves a month later on October 8, the day after the TV series premiere.
So, will you be picking this up digitally or in print? Or both? Or just sticking with the TV show for now?
Via Flash TV News. Also, I’m pretty sure the covers from TV Guide’s article are mock-ups, since they’re using existing publicity photos. Edit: Maybe not. I’ve pulled the full-sized images from DC’s blog, and updated with the Flash cover above.
Originally posted at Speed Force.

TV Guide broke the news that, as we predicted, DC is launching new digital-first Flash and Arrow tie-in comics this fall. Flash: Season Zero will take place between the pilot and second episode, and will “embrace the franchise’s colorful roots” a bit more than the more “grounded” TV show with its own set of comic-specific villains.

Season Zero, which is being co-written by Brooke Eikmeier and Katherine Walczak and features art by Phil Hester and Eric Gapstur, will showcase the entire TV cast, plus these new rogues, a group of circus performers who gained super powers as a result of the S.T.A.R. Labs particle accelerator explosion that also transformed Barry (as seen in the Arrow episode “Three Ghosts,” as well as The Flash’s pilot). This “freakshow gallery,” as Kreisberg calls them, are lead by Mr. Bliss, a character who first appeared in DC’s Starman comic series: “He has the ability to manipulate peoples’ emotions. He and his cadre of circus folk have decided that they’ve been pushed around long enough and are going to take it to society.”

Digital chapters will be released on Mondays, with Flash and Arrow alternating each week. The first digital chapter of Flash: Season Zero will be available on September 8, with the first print edition hitting the shelves a month later on October 8, the day after the TV series premiere.

So, will you be picking this up digitally or in print? Or both? Or just sticking with the TV show for now?

Via Flash TV News. Also, I’m pretty sure the covers from TV Guide’s article are mock-ups, since they’re using existing publicity photos. Edit: Maybe not. I’ve pulled the full-sized images from DC’s blog, and updated with the Flash cover above.

Originally posted at Speed Force.

Flash “Season Zero” Digital-First Comic Launches in September

Flash and Arrow ComicsTV Guide broke the news that, as we predicted, DC is launching new digital-first Flash and Arrow tie-in comics this fall. Flash: Season Zero will take place between the pilot and second episode, and will “embrace the franchise’s colorful roots” a bit more than the more “grounded” TV show with its own set of comic-specific villains.

Season Zero, which is being co-written by Brooke Eikmeier and Katherine Walczak and features art by Phil Hester and Eric Gapstur, will showcase the entire TV cast, plus these new rogues, a group of circus performers who gained super powers as a result of the S.T.A.R. Labs particle accelerator explosion that also transformed Barry (as seen in the Arrow episode “Three Ghosts,” as well as The Flash’s pilot). This “freakshow gallery,” as Kreisberg calls them, are lead by Mr. Bliss, a character who first appeared in DC’s Starman comic series: “He has the ability to manipulate peoples’ emotions. He and his cadre of circus folk have decided that they’ve been pushed around long enough and are going to take it to society.”

Digital chapters will be released on Mondays, with Flash and Arrow alternating each week. The first digital chapter of Flash: Season Zero will be available on September 8, with the first print edition hitting the shelves a month later on October 8, the day after the TV series premiere.

So, will you be picking this up digitally or in print? Or both? Or just sticking with the TV show for now?

Via Flash TV News. Also, I’m pretty sure the covers from TV Guide’s article are mock-ups, since they’re using existing publicity photos.

Kelson.

The post Flash “Season Zero” Digital-First Comic Launches in September appeared first on Speed Force.

How Soon Will We See a Digital-First Flash Comic?

Flash TV logo on a tablet

DC’s new digital-first Sensation Comics series starring Wonder Woman got me thinking about the publisher’s digital-first strategy. In addition to continuity-free stories about Superman, Batman, and now Wonder Woman, it’s also their platform of choice for media tie-in comics to their games and TV shows: Smallville, Batman ’66, Injustice: Gods Among Us, Scribblenauts, Infinite Crisis, Arrow…

There’s an excellent chance that, with the Flash TV show launching in October, we’ll see a TV-continuity digital-first Flash series by the end of the year.

Double Your Flash!

If so, this would be the first time in years that we’ve had two Flash series running concurrently, unless you count the Rogues-heavy miniseries tied to Forever Evil, Blackest Night, and Final Crisis. (And really, isn’t it awesome that DC has been doing Rogues miniseries with so many of their big events lately?) Flash and Impulse ran together from 1995-2002, and All-Flash ran alongside Flash Comics from 1941-1948, during which time the Flash also had a regular solo spot in Comic Cavalcade.

Admittedly, the Arrow tie-in comic only ran during the first season of the show, but maybe the Flash’s higher profile among comics readers will translate to better sales?

Digital What?

For those of you who haven’t looked into DC’s digital-first comics, they typically release three chapters a month at 99 cents through services like ComiXology, Kindle, iTunes, Google Play, and DC’s own branded portal. Each month’s chapters are then collected in a $3.99 print edition. The comics are designed around a horizontal page layout to make them fit better on tablets and widescreen monitors, with two digital pages stacked vertically to make each printed page. (It typically ends up being about 30 pages of story instead of 20.)

You can read on a tablet, a phone (panel-by-panel view can be awkward for converted comics, but these are designed for, well, digital first), or a desktop/laptop through the ComiXology or DC websites. Or you can wait a month or two for the print edition, or a bit longer for the trade paperback.

Kelson.

The post How Soon Will We See a Digital-First Flash Comic? appeared first on Speed Force.

Digital Flash Collections at ComiXology and Google Play

DC has added dozens of digital collections to ComiXology and Google Play, including four Flash books:

  • Move Forward
  • Rogues Revolution
  • Flash: Rebirth
  • Flashpoint

In the case of ComiXology it’s not a big change, since the individual issues have been online since 2011 (along with a much, much deeper catalog). It just makes it a little easier to buy a complete story, and it looks like it’s slightly cheaper to buy the collection than the individual issues.

In the case of Google Play, it opens the audience up to Android tablet owners who don’t have a dedicated comic book app such as ComiXology or DC’s branded ComiXology app.

DC has a much fuller catalog in individual issues on ComiXology, as well as collections on the Kindle, iBooks and Nook stores. And apparently I missed the fact that individual issues are also available on those platforms as well, and have been since last November.

It’s not clear how much of the back catalog can be found on these sites. I can’t see the iBooks store at all, and Amazon isn’t set up to make it easy to browse a long series. The Nook store does let me look at a series, but only seems to have backissues that were released since early 2013. No sign of the Brightest Day Flash issues, though they have the collections of Dastardly Death… and Road to Flashpoint, and the Wally West issues start at #84 and have a lot of gaps. I suspect if I went back over my weekly release posts, I’d find those gaps are where DC skipped over issues that had already been posted on ComiXology. I’ve spot-checked a few issues I saw (and didn’t see) on the Nook store over at Amazon, and it looks like the same issues are present — and missing — there. I’d guess iBooks probably lines up with that catalog as well.

.

The post Digital Flash Collections at ComiXology and Google Play appeared first on Speed Force.

dcwomenkickingass:

I stopped by one of my LCS yesterday and the owner was absolutely giddy about the announcement that DC Comics will be doing a digital first comic based on the 1960’s Batman show. He knows it will ultimately bring people who remember the show into his shop even if it is digital first.

Why?…

I find it bizarre that so many people in comics don’t seem to realize how much bigger the audience for cartoons and movies really is.

Making Sense of Smallville’s “Haunted” Digital and Print Editions

For DC Comics’ same-day print-and-digital releases (i.e. most of their line), the print and digital editions line up exactly. But things get a bit confusing with their digital-first comics, because they run smaller weekly chapters online, then collect them together for the print editions.

In the case of Smallville Season 11, currently running a storyline guest-starring Impulse, every three digital chapters are collected in a print issue the following month. Each digital page is the top or bottom of a print page, run landscape to make it easier to read on a desktop screen or a small tablet.

The numbers get a little confusing because, starting with #28, instead of taking one week off each month to keep the print and digital runs in sync, DC started running a side story during those formerly-skip weeks, which is being collected separately.

Here’s how the digital and print chapters of “Haunted” line up.

Digital Chapters 25-27 = Print Issue #9
Smallville Season 11 Chapter 25 Smallville Season 11 #9

Digital Chapters 29-31 = Print Issue #10
Smallville Season 11 Chapter 29 Smallville Season 11 #10

Digital Chapters 33-35 = Print Issue #11
Smallville Season 11 Chapter 33 Smallville Season 11 #11

Digital Chapters 37-39 = Print Issue #12
Smallville Season 11 #12

Two things stand out about the different covers that suggest different target audiences:

  • The digital covers by Cat Staggs go for a realistic look and focus more on the TV show’s cast.
  • The print covers by Scott Kolins go for a more stylized, comic book look, and focus more on the guest star and super-heroic elements.

This suggests to me that DC is aiming the digital editions at fans of the TV series and the print editions at more traditional comic book fans. It certainly makes sense — by numbers alone, a lot of people who watched Smallville don’t read comics, and it’s going to be easier to get them to buy online than walk into a comic store. I really wonder what DC’s market research has turned up as far as the digital/print audience breakdown.

Making Sense of Smallville’s “Haunted” Digital and Print Editions is a post from Speed Force. .

Wayback Wednesday: That time before the iPad existed, when I wondered whether the Kindle DX might be the device to finally spark a digital comics revolution. 

Wayback Wednesday: That time before the iPad existed, when I wondered whether the Kindle DX might be the device to finally spark a digital comics revolution

Speedster Jesse Quick is back - not in the New 52, but in the digital-first series Ame-Comi as that universe’s Flash.
If you’re not familiar with the title, it started out as a statue line in which DC’s major female characters were re-imagined as anime characters*. They next moved on to adapting female characters who were similar to more well-known male characters: Jesse Quick as the Flash, Duela Dent as the Joker, etc.**
Earlier this summer, DC launched a weekly comic book online featuring these versions of their characters. Wonder Woman has the first spotlight miniseries, then Batgirl, Duela Dent and currently Power Girl.  @TheFlashReborn points out that Jesse Quick makes an appearance as the Flash in Ame-Comi: Duela Dent #2.
There’s one more “solo” miniseries starring Supergirl, and then it rolls over into an ongoing Ame-Comi series. Here’s hoping the Flash will get some time in the spotlight soon.
New chapters of Ame-Comi go up online every Monday on ComiXology, and will appear in print starting in October.
*As I understand it, “ame-comi” is a Japanese term for American comics, so the terminology is sort of backwards - it’s an American interpretation of how the Japanese might adapt an American comic book character.
**Eventually they moved into stranger territory, like repainting Jesse Quick as the Black Flash.
Original Article

Speedster Jesse Quick is back - not in the New 52, but in the digital-first series Ame-Comi as that universe’s Flash.

If you’re not familiar with the title, it started out as a statue line in which DC’s major female characters were re-imagined as anime characters*. They next moved on to adapting female characters who were similar to more well-known male characters: Jesse Quick as the Flash, Duela Dent as the Joker, etc.**

Earlier this summer, DC launched a weekly comic book online featuring these versions of their characters. Wonder Woman has the first spotlight miniseries, then Batgirl, Duela Dent and currently Power Girl. @TheFlashReborn points out that Jesse Quick makes an appearance as the Flash in Ame-Comi: Duela Dent #2.

There’s one more “solo” miniseries starring Supergirl, and then it rolls over into an ongoing Ame-Comi series. Here’s hoping the Flash will get some time in the spotlight soon.

New chapters of Ame-Comi go up online every Monday on ComiXology, and will appear in print starting in October.

*As I understand it, “ame-comi” is a Japanese term for American comics, so the terminology is sort of backwards - it’s an American interpretation of how the Japanese might adapt an American comic book character.

**Eventually they moved into stranger territory, like repainting Jesse Quick as the Black Flash.