Speed Force

Patcave has added a photo to the pool:

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Flash #37 variant cover by Darwyn Cooke. more at Comic Vine.

Next up in DC Comics’ variant cover themes is, for some reason, not a subject or style, but an artist: Darwyn Cooke is doing landscape covers for a ton of DC’s December comics, including The Flash #37.
I first encountered Cooke’s retro 1950s-style art on the miniseries DC: The New Frontier, which I highly recommend. It links the appearance of super-heroes with the dawn of the Space Age, complete with the early Cold War and the societal upheaval going on at the time.  Look for the collected edition or pick it up digitally.
— Kelson.
The post Darwyn Cooke’s Variant Cover for Flash #37 appeared first on Speed Force.

Flash #37 variant cover by Darwyn Cooke. more at Comic Vine.

Next up in DC Comics’ variant cover themes is, for some reason, not a subject or style, but an artist: Darwyn Cooke is doing landscape covers for a ton of DC’s December comics, including The Flash #37.

I first encountered Cooke’s retro 1950s-style art on the miniseries DC: The New Frontier, which I highly recommend. It links the appearance of super-heroes with the dawn of the Space Age, complete with the early Cold War and the societal upheaval going on at the time. Look for the collected edition or pick it up digitally.

Kelson.

The post Darwyn Cooke’s Variant Cover for Flash #37 appeared first on Speed Force.

Patcave has added a photo to the pool:

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Flash Cosplay at Dragon*Con 2014

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Flash group from the Superhero Costuming Forum’s DC Photo Shoot, photo by Patrick Sun. I love the variety of costumes in here, including the New 52 Barry Allen and Jay Garrick, and the Ame-Comi Jesse Quick.

Captain Cold and Golden Glider

Golden Glider and Captain Cold, photographed by Paul Cory.

And don’t miss Michael Blitch’s giant pannable/zoomable group photo of the Superhero Costuming Forum DC photo shoot!

More blogs spotlighting Dragon*Con cosplay today include: The Aquaman Shrine, Captain Carrot’s Burrow, Firestorm Fan, Flowers & Fishnets, Kord Industries, the
Legion of Super-Bloggers
, and Being Carter Hall. Thanks to the Irredeemable Shag of Firestorm Fan for organizing us all!

Kelson.

The post Flash Cosplay at Dragon*Con 2014 appeared first on Speed Force.

Clad in Hero has added a photo to the pool:

Professor Zoom (Reverse Flash)

Flash and Bizarro Flash HeroClix Previewed At HeroClix.com

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Hey Speed Readers,

So in anticipation of the upcoming Flash-themed HeroClix set aptly named, The Flash, HeroClix.com has began previewing some of the updated dials and new characters that we will be seeing come November. First up we have a new version of Barry Allen based on his interpretation in the New 52:

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The Flash comes at us with some Improved Movement and can ignore elevated terrain. The Flash has a trait called Speed Force; every time The Flash moves at least one square and hits one or more adjacent characters, you may place a Speed token on his card after actions resolve. You may also increase The Flash’s speed value by the number of Speed tokens on this card.

What are Speed tokens good for?

Faster Than Thought is the other of The Flash’s traits and will allow him to use Super Senses. Once per turn, you may remove a Speed token from this card to reroll one of his Super Senses rolls.

The Flash has a special power called Flash Fact. As you build up Speed tokens on The Flash’s card he will gain the use of additional powers. So when The Flash has at least 2 Speed tokens, he can use Empower. If he has at least 3 Speed tokens, he can use Enhancement. If he has at least 4 Speed tokens, he can use Probability Control. These are powers that The Flash can use and they do stack based on the number of Speed Tokens on his card.

Read more: http://heroclix.com/heroclix/preview/dc-heroclix-flash-flash-bizarro-flash/#ixzz3CdbTMOAo

I love Barry’s first power “Leaving Footprints On The Sides of Buildings” which gives Barry the ability to ignore elevated terrain (like buildings and mountains) in play, giving him a huge tactical advantage. Running up the sides of buildings and running on water are also two of my favorite things to see The Flash (or any speedster, really) do visually so it is cool that they added it as an ability. The HeroClix team always seems to come up with clever names for power descriptions; They clearly do their research.

Next up is Bizarro Flash who unlike the Reverse Flash(es) is literally the opposite of The Flash. Not only in powers but also mannerisms:

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The uncommon Prime figure has the Speed Force trait and is able to gain tokens and increase his speed value. Bizarro Flash’s other trait called Slow Force allows him to gain Speed tokens in a much different way. At the end of your turn, if Bizarro Flash missed all his attacks this turn, place a Speed token on his card.

How do the Speed tokens help Bizarro Flash?

Bizarro Flash’s attack special power called Slow Dowwwwwwwwn will allow Bizarro Flash to be given a free action and remove a Speed token from his card. If you do, other characters within 8 squares can’t use Hypersonic Speed until your next turn. The other special power on Bizarro Flash’s damage slot is called Picking Up The Pace and shows up in his mid to late dial. This will allow Bizarro Flash to use Flurry and Close Combat Expert. Remove a Speed token from this card and you may activate Close Combat Expert with a close combat attack this turn.

Read more: http://heroclix.com/heroclix/preview/dc-heroclix-flash-flash-bizarro-flash/#ixzz3CdbKb0Ho

HeroClix and Wizkids continue to not only develop interesting ways to simulate super powers in a game but also boasts the most complete DC Universe that just about anyone could ask for. Just about every character has been made into a ‘Clix and therein lies the strength of HeroClix; Heck, I don’t even really play the game anymore, but I love having a complete Speed Force and a complete team of Flash Rogues and villains.

You can read more at HeroClix.com and you can bet that they will be releasing more information as the date draws nearer.

DC HeroClix: The Flash will be released on November 5, 2014 with a Primer Gravity Feed Set (kind of a preview) coming October 10th.

So who plans on picking up a few bricks? Anyone plan on cherry picking like yours truly? Please, feel free to let us know in the comments below.

Thanks for reading!

-Devin

Devin.

The post Flash and Bizarro Flash HeroClix Previewed At HeroClix.com appeared first on Speed Force.

foodbyfax has added a photo to the pool:

Captain America and The Flash

foodbyfax has added a photo to the pool:

Kid Flash, Flash, and Impulse

rhysfunk has added a photo to the pool:

DragonCon 2014 168

Steampunk DC

Annotations: The Trial of The Flash, #349 – “…And The Truth Shall Set Him Free!”

Welcome to the latest installment in our annotations of the collected edition of The Trial of the Flash!  A while back, we analyzed related stories leading up to the release of Showcase Presents: The Trial of the Flash.  In addition, we interviewed author Cary Bates about the buildup and the Trial itself, plus showed you what wasn’t included in the collection.

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IN THIS ISSUE: Closed Timelike Curves!

We’ve reached the penultimate chapter! Thank you very much for reading along. Links to original artwork, scans and research are included throughout this post.  For definitive legal analysis of the story by Bob Ingersoll, go here.  Tom vs. Flash Podcast links here, including these issues.  As always, huge thanks to the DC Indexes. See you after the jump!

COVER by Carmine Infantino and Klaus Janson. This issue went on sale one week after Crisis on Infinite Earths #6, featuring this appearance by Flash (via Comic Art Fans).

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PG 2: According to The Los Angeles Times, the top story of 1985 was “Middle East terrorism, from air hijackings to the Italian liner Achille Lauro.”

PG 3: Cecile mentioned multiple times that she felt Flash would be convicted.

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PG 5: Last time, we mentioned some parallels to bullfighting via “the moment of truth” (and Ernest Hemingway’s Death in the Afternoon), and references in The Trial. Flash, the red matador, kills Reverse Flash in his own moment of truth. Whether or not the Flash intended to kill, the “bullfight” (quote from New York Times Book Review):

…always means death for the bull, for if he is not killed in the arena during the allotted time he is killed outside. It means death for horses–a death in which Mr. Hemingway says there is sometimes an element of the comic… It sometimes means death for the matador, it means in almost every case that he will sooner other later be grievously wounded, and if he is a good matador it means that he must go to the very brink of death every time he puts on a performance.

The public’s afición towards Flash via The Flash Museum and their expectation of an acquittal, and even the (now rounded-up) Rogues as bulls themselves, all parallel the arc of a long bullfight coming to a close. Even a method of killing the bull, explained here, has the matador severing its spinal cord,with a thrust just behind the back of its head.”

The original art for page five can be seen here.

PG 7 & 8: According to this site, being “released on your own recognizance” is the equivalent of receiving free bail. Here is a list of 16 superhero trials over at The AV Club, with Flash’s at #3. Page 7 features Wally West’s last on-panel appearance in Flash vol. 2.  The original art for that page can be seen here.

PG 12: Rainbow Raider’s first appearance was in Flash #286 (1980). That’s 20 years after Captain Boomerang (1st app. Flash #117, Dec. 1960), who is the next junior Rogue.  I have always assumed Dunce-Cap Peak is the same place Big Sir took Flash back in issue #340.

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PG 14: In a late 1970s psychology experiment called “Rat Park,” Canadian psychologist Bruce Alexander found that caged rats consumed more opiates than rats provided with comfort and accommodations.

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PG 15: The structure in the second panel is the Central City of the 30th Centrury. It made its first appearance (see image at top of this post) in Flash #203 (1971), “The Flash’s Wife is a Two-Timer”. In this Robert Kanigher/Irv Novick story, Flash and his wife Iris discover that she is from the 30th Century. It also appears on the cover of Flash #237, which we annotated here, and in Flash #260.

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PG 16: This Scientific American article from this week cites a study that simulated Closed Timelike Curves (CTCs) and their potential to resolve temporal paradoxes.

If you can clone quantum states, you can violate the Heisenberg uncertainty principle,” which comes in handy in quantum cryptography because the principle forbids simultaneously accurate measurements of certain kinds of paired variables, such as position and momentum. “But if you clone that system, you can measure one quantity in the first and the other quantity in the second, allowing you to decrypt an encoded message.

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PG 17: This sequence took place during the issues omitted from the Showcase Presents collection.

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PG 21 & 22: Last issue (below), Newbury seemed to know more about Reverse Flash than he does here.

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Reverse Flash is originally from the 25th Century. We know “Newbury” is from the 30th, but he notes the advanced technology of Reverse Flash here. If the wands and silhouettes haven’t given it away yet, this is another big clue.

PG 23: This counts as a reveal, right? The re-animated “Reverse Flash” is Abra Kadabra, last formally seen in Flash #300. I’ll leave you with this, from the last page of that issue.

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See you next week!

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Greg Elias.

The post Annotations: The Trial of The Flash, #349 – “…And The Truth Shall Set Him Free!” appeared first on Speed Force.