Speed Force
kelsonv:

gorogues:

meindraws:

I hope your day will be an excellent one! May it end with a bang to a refreshing new start! :)

Oh my gosh oh my gosh oh my gosh!!  Thank you so much!!  It really means a lot to me :)   Thank you again, Mein!! <3

Here’s hoping your birthday was a spinningly good one!

Oops, I reblogged this to my personal journal by accident.

kelsonv:

gorogues:

meindraws:

I hope your day will be an excellent one! May it end with a bang to a refreshing new start! :)

Oh my gosh oh my gosh oh my gosh!!  Thank you so much!!  It really means a lot to me :)   Thank you again, Mein!! <3

Here’s hoping your birthday was a spinningly good one!

Oops, I reblogged this to my personal journal by accident.

gorogues:

Look what Lupintyde sent me, to hang out with my Roscoe doll ^_^  So precious!  And also a nice little calendar with chibi Rogues drawn by her husband Dave :)  Thank you both very much!

(The grey cat checking her out is James [Jesse], and the fluffy cat in the background is Lenny [Snart].  Because when you have too many cats you might as well name them after Rogues.)

The Top has come back from the dead at least three times&#8230;by his own sheer force of will.

The Top has come back from the dead at least three times…by his own sheer force of will.

High Speed Hauntings

Flash Annual #11: Ghosts - Cover

Ghost stories seem a natural fit with some superheroes. Not so with the Flash. An origin based in science, scientifically trained alter-egos, villains who use technology. Even the “magician” villain, Abra Kadabra, is more of a techno-mage, using highly advanced future technology to carry out transformations that seem like magic to our experience. The closest the Flash mythos gets to the supernatural is the metaphysical nature of the speed force, and even that is described in terms of energy and the nature of space-time.

So it makes sense that for 1998′s “Ghosts” annuals, the Flash story would feature not a traditional ghost, but one tied to the speed force: Johnny Quick, who had vanished into the speed force two years earlier during Dead Heat.

It all starts with Wally West sleepwalking — or, rather, sleeprunning — and being pursued by the spectral form of his former ally. Wally calls in Max Mercury for advice, but tries to hide what’s going on from Jesse Quick. The mystery is put aside, though, when Wally’s old flame Tina McGee shows up with a horrible problem: the long-dormant treatments that turned he husband Jerry into Speed Demon have activated, turning him super-fast, super-strong, and psychotic. The three speedsters have to stop him from causing too much damage and figure out a way to restore him to normal, all while Wally’s afraid to run at top speed for fear of his personal ghost.

The story acts like it wants to take itself seriously, but bounces around in sitcom territory most of the time: Everyone shows up at Wally’s door within a few minutes for no apparent reason, including Tina, who would have been better off calling him to save time. Linda and Tina have forgotten their earliest meeting just so Wally can worry about Linda finding out that he and Tina used to date. And while Wally’s tendency to keep secrets from people who really ought to be told is certainly in character (it’s a big part of Terminal Velocity), his refusal to tell Jesse that he’s being haunted by her father reads more like an episode of “I Love Lucy” than like a character learning a valuable lesson. Speed Demon’s relapse is never really explained or tied to the main plot — it just happened.

In the end, Wally does learn an important lesson: “It’s not always about you.” Johnny Quick was trying to come back to say goodbye to his daughter, but Wally was the only person he could contact.

Flash Annual #11: A Quick Family Reunion

Two other notable stories featuring ghosts come to mind when thinking about the Flash: “The Doorway to the Unknown” and the return of the Top.

Through the Doorway

Doorway to the Unknown: Splash Page (Flash #148)

1964′s “Doorway to the Unknown” (Flash vol.1 #148) begins with the Flash returning to his apartment only to find a man waiting for him, seeking his help to put right a wrong he committed. Fred Dallman had embezzled hundreds of thousands of dollars, then framed an innocent man for it when his crime was discovered. But as he left town with his stolen money, he learned that the fall guy had been kidnapped during a jailbreak by other convicts who wanted him to lead them to the money. Sending an innocent to prison hadn’t bothered Dallman, but endangering his life did.

Dallman asked the Flash to rescue Dean…then vanished before the Flash’s eyes!

Doorway to the Unknown: Vanished!

Comics Should Be Good did a piece on this story last year. They don’t reveal the ending, but you can probably guess from the fact that I’ve included it here that Dallman was, in fact dead at the time he spoke to the Flash. He’d just been killed in a car accident on the way out of Central City, as he tried to return the stolen money, clear Dean’s name, and save his life.

Doorway to the Unknown: The Twist

Climbing to the Top

Resurrections are a dime a dozen in comics these days, but the Top is notable not only for being the first major Flash villain to die, but also for returning from the dead at least three times purely under his own willpower.

Up until Flash: Rebirth rewrote history, Barry Allen’s parents were both alive through his entire career as the Flash. In Flash #297, (1981), they were in a car accident while driving to Central City to visit Barry. Henry Allen’s heart stopped for thirty seconds until the other driver performed CPR on him, but in that time, the ghost of the Top possessed his body. It wasn’t clear for several issues just what was going on, but he started acting strange and secretly meeting a younger woman while Nora Allen was in the hospital.

Hey, babycakes!

The woman turned out to be Golden Glider, and she and the Top began planning a realcomeback. Why settle for living in the body of a middle-aged man when he could take over the Flash instead?

Whisper something sexy to me

The Top and Golden Glider put their plan into motion in Flash vol.1 #302-303, trying to kill the Flash just enough for the Top to move in and take over. Barry faked his death, and the Top released his hold on Henry Allen, drifting back to the afterlife.

You’d think that would be the end, but he kept coming back. in 1990, Hawk & Dove Annual #1 featured a team of dead villains in hell, and over the next year of the series, the Top’s ghost communicated with Hawk, tricking him into setting up the circumstances for him to take over a new body. Years later, the Identity Crisis tie-in “The Secret of Barry Allen” revealed yet another return to life just a week after Henry Allen’s recovery.

Infinite Halloween

In the last few years, DC has been releasing annual Halloween and Christmas specials. The Flash has made a few appearances here and there. Mirror Master vs. Bloody Mary with Kid Flash caught in the middle, for instance.

The Speed of Life

“The Speed of Life,” from 2007′s “Infinite Halloween Special” is a more traditional ghost story. Physicist Ira West, father of Iris Allen and grandfather of Wally West, had made only a handful of appearances over the last two decades. In this tale set after the West family’s return from another dimension, Wally comes home to find his grandfather in the living room, telling stories to his children. That wouldn’t be out of the ordinary except for one problem: Ira had died since the last time we saw him.

Wally and Ira discuss the last time they saw each other.

Remember what I said earlier about the Flash being more science-based than supernatural? In the end, it turns out that Ira might not technically be dead, so much as he was transformed by a tachyon experiment gone wrong. His “ghost” is just him bouncing around in time, exploring new frontiers of knowledge.

Speed of Life: Goodbye, Ira West

Unlike most of the stories in this particular collection, this one ends up being not creepy or horrific, but touching. Wally gets to meet his grandfather one last time. Ira gets to meet his great-grandchildren, and they get to meet him. Much like Jesse Quick’s last chance to say goodbye to her father, this ghost story is a family reunion.

More Halloween Heroes

Speed Force isn’t the only comics fan blog looking back at these annuals and other ghost stories for this year’s Halloween. Thanks to Chad of Corps Conjecture and The Lanterncast for organizing this multi-blog crossover event. Thanks also to Lia for providing the scans for the Top. Don’t miss today’s Halloween Horror series at The Rogues Kick Ass.

Check out the other sites below:

Halloween Heroes

High Speed Hauntings is a post from Speed Force. .

Fan Expo cosplay

The Terrible Top Fan Expo was held in Toronto on August 23-26 this year, and size-wise was quite possibly bigger than ever. I’ve gone every year for about a decade now, but this con was different: I cosplayed for the first time! Nobody who knows me would be surprised that I decided to go as the Top, as I’m probably the Internet’s most diehard Top fan.

I cosplayed on Saturday, which is the convention’s major cosplaying day. And to my great surprise and delight, I met a Heat Wave cosplayer! While I’ve since learned that somebody else dressed as Captain Cold in a previous year, I’ve never personally seen a Rogue at Fan Expo, so it was really great to see one during my first time. And many people seemed quite excited to see Heat Wave (Brando Lars) and I together. We also met up with a couple of Flashes and participated in a photoshoot with other people dressed as DC characters. It was a lot of fun.

I was personally gratified to hear from people who recognized my costume and liked the Rogues, and had some interesting conversations with strangers. It was nice to meet and chat with fellow fans that I probably wouldn’t have met otherwise. The great thing about wearing a costume is you’re pretty much advertising what you like right off the bat, and gets it all out in the open for people to talk about. It’s a good way to show what you enjoy and meet people of like-minded interests, and if that’s something you’re interested in then I highly recommend cosplaying.

And now the photos!

Here I am in front of the green screen at the DC booth. The picture turned out fairly amusingly, as the green parts of my costume were rendered invisible and I looked somewhat like a ghost (which is fitting for the Top).

A meeting of Rogues!

With Flash fill-in artist Marcus To.

I was the last person in line to see Chris Sprouse at the DC booth, and people rather liked the visual of me holding the sign I’d been given. This photo was taken by a photographer from EB Games, and put in their Facebook gallery.

Apparently Flash has been brainwashing the Top again, tsk.

Some pics from the DC group photoshoot.

Poor Heat Wave; punched by the Flash and abandoned by his buddy. So much for Rogue solidarity.

We villains are on a schedule.

This picture (and the first one) was taken at a free photoshoot by Convoke Photography, and you had the option of buying the digital images on a CD if you wanted them. I was really pleased with the results.

Some links to other people’s photos:

A DC group shot taken by a stranger. The Flash doesn’t realize the danger he’s in…

A solo photo of the Flash

This site has a nice picture of Heat Wave

What do you think? Have you cosplayed before, or are you thinking of trying it now?

Original Article

gorogues:

I’m waaaay behind on things, and won’t be able to catch up until after the con (though I absolutely will), but here’s a pic of me cosplaying today.  There was a booth that took free professional photos and you could buy the digital images on a CD if you wanted them.
Also, I ran into a Heat Wave at the show and he was a really great guy!  We got some photos but they aren’t on this computer yet, I’ll have to get and post them later.  A girl dressed as Hawkeye said she wished she’d brought her Captain Cold outfit to go with us.  I’ve never seen a Rogue at Fan Expo before, so it was pretty great to run into other Rogue cosplayers the first time I did it.  A bunch of people knew who I was supposed to be and some were really excited about it.  An older gentleman said he remembered buying Roscoe’s first appearance when he was a kid, and he was only one issue off in remembering the issue number.  All in all, it was really cool and I had a lot of fun.
More later!  And I will catch up, don’t worry :)

gorogues:

I’m waaaay behind on things, and won’t be able to catch up until after the con (though I absolutely will), but here’s a pic of me cosplaying today.  There was a booth that took free professional photos and you could buy the digital images on a CD if you wanted them.

Also, I ran into a Heat Wave at the show and he was a really great guy!  We got some photos but they aren’t on this computer yet, I’ll have to get and post them later.  A girl dressed as Hawkeye said she wished she’d brought her Captain Cold outfit to go with us.  I’ve never seen a Rogue at Fan Expo before, so it was pretty great to run into other Rogue cosplayers the first time I did it.  A bunch of people knew who I was supposed to be and some were really excited about it.  An older gentleman said he remembered buying Roscoe’s first appearance when he was a kid, and he was only one issue off in remembering the issue number.  All in all, it was really cool and I had a lot of fun.

More later!  And I will catch up, don’t worry :)

Comics Should Be Good lists the 5 Goofiest Moments in The Flash #122-126.

Comics Should Be Good lists the 5 Goofiest Moments in The Flash #122-126.

Friday Flashback

The *ahem* top post at Speed Force this week, by the amount of discussion, was Lia’s post on “Why I Like the Top.” But the most-read article was Devin’s write-up on the exclusive Flash figure that will ship with Best Buy’s edition of Justice League: Doom later this month. Also this week: The first part of Greg’s annotations on a hidden Flash/New Gods crossover from the 1970s, in Super-Team Family #15, and the latest sales ranking for The Flash #5 in January.  Meanwhile, the Wayback Wednesday feature looked back at a classic original Young Justice moment with Impulse, Superboy and the Ray: remember when your comic was canceled?

Why I Like The Top

Since the Top is not an especially popular character, occasionally I get asked why I like him or people seem to be incredulous that anyone could. I figured it was finally time to write a short essay about it. This isn’t necessarily intended to change other people’s minds about him; of course he has a ton of flaws and I’m well aware he’s not particularly appealing to most people. It’s just an explanation of what I like about him.

I first developed an interest when reading some short biography, which stated to the effect “He taught himself to spin at high speeds, and the spinning increased his intelligence”. Frankly, I was delighted by the sublime ridiculousness of it, and can’t understand why some people consider that aspect of his origin to be a negative thing. I enjoy at least a bit of silliness and light-heartedness in superhero comics, a genre that by definition has some inherent goofiness.

I admire that he’s very much self-made. He taught himself about tops and the physics of rotation, taught himself how to spin, and built all of his own wide-ranging inventions. His genius intellect and psionic powers were unexpected gifts, but also the result of his own achievement (spinning). His repeated escapes from Hell and returns from the dead seem to have been the result of his own cleverness and stubbornness; he decided he wanted to come back, so he went and did it. He has a hell of an ego, but you can see why.

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"Lightning Strikes" DC Universe Online!

Hey Speed Readers,

For those of you still playing DC Universe Online for the PS3 and PC (or that jumped back on board for the Free to Play Content), the second expansion pack, “Lightning Strikes” is forthcoming and will be focusing on some of our favorite speedsters and adding some new gameplay elements as well.

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